Page 140 - Spring Book 2020: Finding Peace in a Restless World
P. 140

 Phillip Garbutt
I first acquired an interest in photography while watch- ing my father in the early 1950’s print photo Christmas cards in the kitchen. In the early 1960’s, I helped my youngest brother build his darkroom in a used shipping crate. During my career as an Instructional Support Technician for the Geological Sciences at CSU, East Bay, I produced photographs to document research and for publications.
I have always found pleasure in looking and examining photographs made by other practitioners of the photo- graphic arts. I especially enjoy early photographers who
between seven and eight am. I will then drive back hopefully with a photo good enough to print and frame for this year’s portrait of the war memorial for Califor- nia veterans killed in action in the Vietnam war.
The flag in the memorial photo is not flying but will be this morning, as I have found in past photo visits. I will be thinking of you on the hour drive to the memorial. I hope you will remember our brave Vietnam era veterans when you hopefully look at these photos today. Thank you.
Sincerely, Steve George, 2020.
 Abstracting a scene with black and white allowed me to think about these forms as composition, texture, contour, light, and shadow. I con- tinue to be intrigued by the way light plays with natural or man-made forms, be they weathered wood, trees in snow, rocks on a beach, or the contour and texture of a woman’s form.
worked with primitive equipment and techniques in the American West. I have followed the history of photog- raphy since its early beginnings with William Henry Fox Talbot and others.
Upon retiring in December 2006, I enrolled in a va- riety of workshops at PhotoCentral. These included "historic" processes, which we now call "alternative photographic processes" and included cyanotype, car- bon transfer, platinum-palladium, and monochrome gum bichromate. I was also introduced to the digital darkroom and the production of color separations and digital negatives. I have received awards for my photo- graphs printed with cyanotype, carbon transfer, plati- num-palladium and gum bichromate processes. I also enjoy digital photography having received the "Best of Show" for a still life digital print in PhotoCentral’s 2015 "Spring Exhibition."
Steve George
Around five pm yesterday, I drove right to the Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial in Sacramento to see if the Aecia tree near the memorial had finally bloomed. It has, and here are two test photos I took as the sun was setting yesterday.
It is five-thirty in the morning on a Wednesday. I am having my coffee for the one hour drive on the not very crowded route 80 to our state capitol in Sacramento, California. I like the early morning light and will shoot
Asmund Gjevik
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Asmund Gjevik was born in the late 1930’s on a small island in Norway where nearly everyone made their liv- ing by fishing or farming.
My experience with dramatic contrasts of land and sea- scapes gave me an intense appreciation for black and white photography. In my fascination with these con- trasts, black and white has always seemed a great choice of medium to explore my art.
Abstracting a scene with black and white allowed me to think about these forms as composition, texture, con- tour, light, and shadow. I continue to be intrigued by the way light plays with natural or man-made forms, be they weathered wood, trees in snow, rocks on a beach, or the contour and texture of a woman’s form.
Curtis Griffin
Biography: Curtis Griffin was born in California. He is now retired and dedicating more time to his avocations, photography and music. Curtis has been photograph- ing for many years and trying different mediums includ- ing pinhole, medium-format film and transparencies, and also large format. He favors panoramic black and white landscapes and pinhole photography.
Artist Statement: I choose to capture special moments in nature, using film, as well as digital images.
– Asmund Gjevik-
 













































































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