Page 150 - Spring Book 2020: Finding Peace in a Restless World
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 Ron Rigge
Ron was born in California in 1944 and is currently a resident of Pleasanton, California. He began photo- graphing in the early 1970s. Since then his work has involved many areas of photography, including medium format black & white and color as well as some alterna- tive processes. Ron has studied with Western photog- raphers such as Al Weber, Robert Dawson and Steve Dzerigian. Some of the most important influences on his work have been Eliot Porter, Philip Hyde, William Christenberry and Walker Evans.
Ron’s works include a series on the disappearing as- pects of the American West, from decaying signs and ar-
Remember, read each poem aloud in your best Acade- my Award-Winning Voice! That’s the only way to do it!
Alan Rubinstein
Over the decades, photography has grown in impor- tance in my life. It provides a vehicle to focus my obser- vations, and has served to balance my analytic and artis- tic sides. During this time, the focus of my photography has shifted. Today my primary subjects are people, and my method for their portrayal has been ever changing.
A camera always accompanies me when I leave home, and I often set out with photography as the primary reason for an outing. Photography allows me to fully
 Photography allows me to fully engage with, truly see and remember more about the slices of my life. Later, reviewing and sharing the re- sulting photographs reanimates the memory of the events along with the circumstances surrounding the instant when the image was taken.
 chitecture to orchards. His most satisfying recent work has been of a “pictorialist” style that can be produced from infrared films that are still available. He prints all of his own work, including Ilfochrome color prints, in a conventional home darkroom. He has explored digi- tal photography methods, but still enjoys working with classic silver techniques.
Ron’s work can be found in many collections both na- tionally and in California
Bruce Roberts
Bruce Roberts is a true local yokel, a native of Hayward, now entering his sixth term as Hayward’s Poet Laure- ate. In that time, he has written and read several poems at official functions, besides reading his poetry as en- tertainment at many community locations and events. After 35 years reading to the middle school students in his classroom, he still loves to read aloud and urges everyone to do so with his poetry.
Married for 50 years to his wife Kathleen, he also has three married sons and daughters-in-law and five ter- rific granddaughters. In his sixth year on the Hayward Arts Council Board, he loves to encourage Hayward art everywhere, and also to read, sing, travel, hike, work outside, putter, and—of course—write and read poetry!
– Alan Rubinstein
engage with, truly see and remember more about the slices of my life. Later, reviewing and sharing the result- ing photographs reanimates the memory of the events along with the circumstances surrounding the instant when the image was taken.
Mark Shaw
I was first introduced to film photography in my early youth but gradually abandoned it as I focused on my ed- ucation and early career pursuits. Following a long and productive professional life I "retired" in 2012. This new chapter afforded me more time to resume a long dormant interest in photography.
I have been actively pursuing digital photography since 2009 and enjoy the challenge of capturing compelling images as well as the equal challenge of rendering them for a print medium.
My photographic interests encompass landscapes, art and architecture, sports, wildlife, and a bit of street photography. I am inspired by the photographic work of Geir Jordahl, Q.T. Luong, Dave Heath, among others. It is the melding of the visual art form associated with photographic capture and the nearly infinite possibili- ties that modern digital photography allows with digital image processing that has renewed and maintained my interest in photography.
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